Early Childhood

Ages 4 Months – 4 Years
Baby care | Play group

The first five years have so much to do with how the next 80 turn out

– Bill Gates

The Waldorf philosophy of early childhood development

100-year-old ideas that are increasingly being validated by modern pedagogical research.

The importance of storytelling, of the natural rhythms of daily life, of the evolutionary changes in the child,
of art as the necessary underpinning of learning, and of the aesthetic environment as a whole
– all basic to Waldorf education for decades – are being discovered and verified
by researchers unconnected to the Waldorf movement.
– Paul Bayers, Professor at Teachers College, Columbia University

Rudolf Steiner considered the following conditions and experiences essential
for the healthy development of the young child.

Love and emotional warmth

Love and emotional warmth, rather than any particular early childhood program, is the basis for the healthy development of young children. The early childhood teacher strives to protect and nurture the unfolding of each individual child through loving interest, care, acceptance and respect.

“Children who live in an atmosphere of love and warmth,
and who have around them truly good examples to imitate,
are living in their proper element.”
– Rudolf Steiner

Everything that surrounds the young child, both visible and invisible, has an impact on them.

Early learning is profoundly connected to everything the young child sees, hears.

Baby Care Programme

 

Caters for 12 babies from 4 months to two years old, from 7h15 to 17h30, Monday to Friday.

The Baby Care Programme at Michael Mount was started in direct response to calls from parents for a loving, gentle space run on Waldorf principles, to care for their babies.

“Most early education programs have been forced to accelerate the teaching of cognitive skills (which research is showing is inappropriate for these young children), while focusing less and less on their physical, emotional and social needs”. – Jane McCoy, BA, MA Curriculum Design, and a certified Waldorf teacher.

Babies do not distinguish between themselves and their surroundings. Michael Mount provides a safe haven where babies are slowly, gently
introduced to the world. READ MORE

Play Group

 

The Michael Mount Early Childhood Centre is home to two playgroups. Each group consist of 16 to 18 children between the ages of two and four. School times: 8h00 to 12h00, Monday to Friday. Early morning care is available from 7h15 and aftercare from 12h00 to 17h30.

The primary goal of the Waldorf early childhood programme is to provide children with a safe, nurturing space in which to access their most important learning tool at this age: their imagination.

Toys are made from natural materials and are as unfinished as possible, so that the children are left to ‘finish’ them with their own imagination. Playthings include simple dolls and wooden objects, as well as beautifully coloured cloths for dressing up and ‘building houses’.

Imaginative, free play is considered one of the most.READ MORE

Parent Education

 

Michael Mount offers a variety of resources to assist new and not-so-new parents. These include a Resource Library, parenting groups, as well as workshops and seminars on subjects ranging from pregnancy, breastfeeding, childcare, discipline and more.

Each class has four Parent Meetings during the year, giving parents an opportunity to meet and share with other parents, and to converse with the teachers. One-on-one consultations are available.

Whether or not you have a child at Michael Mount, you are invited to subscribe to Contemplations for Conscious Parents and get a short, but thought provoking quote in your inbox, once a week.

Information about parent education events and happenings – some of which are open to the public – are usually listed at the bottom of theContemplations email.

Informed parenting

The Vital Role of Play in Childhood

by Joan Almon

Play is like a spring that bubbles up from deep within a child. It is so fundamental to the make-up of the child that it is often hard to separate play from learning. Whether children are working on new physical skills, social relations, or cognitive content, they approach life with a playful spirit.

Read More…

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